RAINDANCE 2014 DAY 3 pt 2| LIKE THE WIND + GREENCARD WARRIORS

Like the Wind
DIRECTOR(S): MARCO S. PUCCIONI WRITER(S):HEIDRUN SCHLLEEF, MARCO SIMON PUCCIONI, NICOLA LUSUARDI DOP: GHERARDO GOSSI CAST: VALERIA GOLINO, FILIPPO TIMI, FRANCESCO SCIANNA
‘Like The Wind’ chronicles the sorrowful life of Armida Miserere – one of Italy’s first female prison governors. – Raindance.org

Italy is having a moment in cinema. They’re turning the camera on what’s wrong with their society and are bringing those who have suffered an injustice to the forefront. Stories are being shared that may have not made it to the nationwide news, art is not dead, Italy is using film to have an open serious dialogue about a system that is corrupt and continuously failing its people.
Like the Wind is most certainly a story not widely across the world let alone in the country in which the based on true events film is set.
It chronicles the tragic life of prison governor, Armida Miserere, as she battles in her career and personal life to reign in a corrupt and wavering prison system.
As one of Italy’s first female governors, she’s hard skinned and determined not to let her majority male peers see her falter. Bullets in the mail and the consequential murder of her partner is a bitter pill to swallow, but Miserere marches on, prison hopping as it were to conduct and instill her ethics to bring order to a chaotic organisation and to bring her partner’s death to murderers.
Directed by Marco Simone Puccioni and co-written by Puccioni, award-winning screenwriter Heidrun Schleef and playwright Nicola Lusuardi – Like the Wind is a brave  film. Featuring a brave and bold performance from Valeria Golino, who more than holds her own amongst a body of imposing italian men but is never self-righteous; Golino plays Miserere with a stoic countenance that is hard-headed and flawed. She’s also smart, sexy and vulnerable. Round this collection of stellar talent off with a stunning score composed by Shigeru Umebayashi (House of Flying Daggers) and a beautiful cinematography by Gherardo Gossi where we flit between nostalgic warmly lit home scenes to grim cold prison corridors and smoke-filled offices. Like the Wind  is a very difficult and frustrating film to follow, but a commendable documentation of one of the country’s forgotten heroines.
Greencard Warriors
An undocumented family struggles to adapt to the violent Los Angeles. – Raindance.org
DIRECTOR(S):MIRIAM KRUISHOOP WRITER(S): MIRIAM KRUISHOOP DOP: HELLE JENSEN CAST: MANNY PEREZ, ANGEL AMARAL, VIVICA A. FOX
Italy isn’t the only place that’s taking a light on its questionable, unbalanced and unfair government and economic systems versus its people. Especially when it comes to an ever-expanding multicultural society. In Greencard Warriors Jesus and his family have been living in America illegally, trying to get by on odd jobs, trying to keep his two eldest sons  out of trouble. Hailing from El Salvador the family join countless others in downtown California where a subculture of young immigrant latino’s roll in gangs to get by and step up and help their struggling families. For Jesus the promise of better for his eldest son couldn’t come sooner, when military recruiters’ parley with him to convince his son to sign up in exchange for a greencard for the entire family. Jesus not only wants to remove his son from the troublesome life of crime he’s fallen into, he’s also desperate to for his family to live in America permanently without looking over their shoulders. When the eldest is shipped off, it leaves  14-year-old Angel open to being recruited by a different army, the one his brother left behind. Angel meets Jasmine, but she’s from a different part of town and being together draws up other issues on race and loyalty. It’s an honest and violent depiction of modern racial segregation, and the subculture of immigrant youths trying to fend for themselves in a country where they’re seemingly maligned and targeted; the ethical and morally wrong tactics employed by the military to recruit soldiers by offering the American dream with a bold-faced lie. A harrowing film that strives to make a point about the expanding divide and increased disillusionment between those serving in the law and order and the people its supposed to be serving.
Angel Amaral pulls out a plausible and empathetic performance as the mild-mannered boy who has no choice but to grow up quickly for the sake of his family; some of his best scenes are shared with Manny Perez (Jesus) as the father and son at odds with how to handle family affairs, after one night, when things suddenly go from bad to worse.
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